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The Kinds Of Stress Affecting Infertility

Infertility is a widespread issue affecting both men and women globally, stemming from a variety of causes. One potential contributing factor to infertility is stress, which can manifest in various forms and impact an individual’s hormonal and nervous systems, subsequently affecting fertility. High-stress hormone levels have been linked to disrupted ovulation, making conception challenging.

Stress can arise from multiple sources, including environmental factors, work-related pressures, family dynamics, or traumatic events like accidents or family losses. In response, the body may release potent neurochemicals and hormones to prepare for “fight or flight” reactions. Various stressors can affect an individual’s fertility, including:

  • Age Factor and Time Pressure: Infertility is most prevalent among individuals aged 20-45, and fertility naturally declines with age. As couples encounter difficulties in conceiving, the pressure of time can intensify stress levels.
  • Physical Stress: Physical stress can affect both males and females differently. In men, it has been shown to significantly reduce sperm quality. Lifestyle factors like alcohol consumption, caffeine intake, obesity, smoking, drug use, excessive exercise, overwork, and exposure to heat can contribute to physical stress.
  • Emotional Stress: Sudden, distressing experiences can lead to emotional stress. Such stress may result in sleep disturbances, substantial weight fluctuations, erratic eating habits, and chronic fatigue, all of which can influence an individual’s fertility.
  • Financial Stress: Preparing for parenthood can be financially taxing due to various necessary preparations. Financial stress, stemming from work or business demands, can impose considerable mental and physical strain.
  • Relationship Stress: The combined impact of the aforementioned stressors can strain social relationships, adding another layer of stress. Individuals may withdraw from others and resist offered assistance, exacerbating their stress levels.

 

While there isn’t yet conclusive data establishing a direct link between stress and infertility, some studies suggest that stress-reduction techniques can have a positive impact.

“When stress-reduction techniques are employed, something happens in some women that allows them to get pregnant when they couldn’t get pregnant before,” notes Dr. Allen Morgan, director of the Shore Institute for Reproductive Medicine in Lakewood, N.J.

Effective stress-reduction techniques may include acupuncture, massage therapy, appropriate exercise, dietary improvements, and other stress-reduction methods. To better understand the relationship between stress and infertility, don’t hesitate to reach out to us for more information. You can also email us at victoryartlab@yahoo.com

The Kinds Of Stress Affecting Infertility

Infertility is a widespread issue affecting both men and women globally, stemming from a variety of causes. One potential contributing factor to infertility is stress, which can manifest in various forms and impact an individual’s hormonal and nervous systems, subsequently affecting fertility. High-stress hormone levels have been linked to disrupted ovulation, making conception challenging.

Stress can arise from multiple sources, including environmental factors, work-related pressures, family dynamics, or traumatic events like accidents or family losses. In response, the body may release potent neurochemicals and hormones to prepare for “fight or flight” reactions. Various stressors can affect an individual’s fertility, including:

  • Age Factor and Time Pressure: Infertility is most prevalent among individuals aged 20-45, and fertility naturally declines with age. As couples encounter difficulties in conceiving, the pressure of time can intensify stress levels.
  • Physical Stress: Physical stress can affect both males and females differently. In men, it has been shown to significantly reduce sperm quality. Lifestyle factors like alcohol consumption, caffeine intake, obesity, smoking, drug use, excessive exercise, overwork, and exposure to heat can contribute to physical stress.
  • Emotional Stress: Sudden, distressing experiences can lead to emotional stress. Such stress may result in sleep disturbances, substantial weight fluctuations, erratic eating habits, and chronic fatigue, all of which can influence an individual’s fertility.
  • Financial Stress: Preparing for parenthood can be financially taxing due to various necessary preparations. Financial stress, stemming from work or business demands, can impose considerable mental and physical strain.
  • Relationship Stress: The combined impact of the aforementioned stressors can strain social relationships, adding another layer of stress. Individuals may withdraw from others and resist offered assistance, exacerbating their stress levels.

 

While there isn’t yet conclusive data establishing a direct link between stress and infertility, some studies suggest that stress-reduction techniques can have a positive impact.

“When stress-reduction techniques are employed, something happens in some women that allows them to get pregnant when they couldn’t get pregnant before,” notes Dr. Allen Morgan, director of the Shore Institute for Reproductive Medicine in Lakewood, N.J.

Effective stress-reduction techniques may include acupuncture, massage therapy, appropriate exercise, dietary improvements, and other stress-reduction methods. To better understand the relationship between stress and infertility, don’t hesitate to reach out to us for more information. You can also email us at victoryartlab@yahoo.com

About Dr. Gia Pastorfide

Dr. Gia C. Pastofide obtained her pre-medical degree in BS Psychology from the University of the Philippines – Diliman, where she graduated magna cum laude.

She had her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at UP-PGH, her fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility with a focus on In Vitro Fertilization and Minimally Invasive Surgery at the National University Hospital in Singapore, her fellowship in Reproductive Medicine at The University of Tokyo Hospital, and her Masters in Reproductive Medicine and Clinical Embryology at The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Presently, Dr. Gia is the Medical Director of Victory ART Laboratory, a clinical associate professor at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UP-PGH, and an active consultant at Makati Medical Center and Cardinal Santos Medical Center.

About Dr. Gia Pastorfide

Dr. Gia C. Pastofide obtained her pre-medical degree in BS Psychology from the University of the Philippines – Diliman, where she graduated magna cum laude.

She had her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at UP-PGH, her fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility with a focus on In Vitro Fertilization and Minimally Invasive Surgery at the National University Hospital in Singapore, her fellowship in Reproductive Medicine at The University of Tokyo Hospital, and her Masters in Reproductive Medicine and Clinical Embryology at The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Presently, Dr. Gia is the Medical Director of Victory ART Laboratory, a clinical associate professor at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UP-PGH, and an active consultant at Makati Medical Center and Cardinal Santos Medical Center.