Search
Search

Do’s And Don’ts After A Miscarriage

A miscarriage is the spontaneous loss of a pregnancy within 20 to 23 weeks, typically characterized by vaginal bleeding, often accompanied by cramps and period-like pain. Approximately 15% of pregnancies result in miscarriage, attributed to various factors, including:

  • Non-viable fetus
  • Blighted Ovum (Undeveloped fetus)
  • Infections
  • Poor Health Condition
  • Substance use (such as drinking, smoking, and drugs)

 

In many cases, determining a specific cause for a miscarriage is challenging. It’s crucial for parents to understand that it is rarely their fault or a result of neglect.

Following a miscarriage, what should be the next steps? Here are some recommended actions for parents:

  • Reiterate that the miscarriage was not their fault.
  • Consult with a healthcare provider and undergo examinations to check for signs of infection or other reproductive health issues.
  • Consider counseling if needed to cope with emotional challenges.
  • Allow time for both emotional and physical healing.
  • Adopt a healthier lifestyle, including a balanced diet and moderate exercise. Consult the doctor for suitable prenatal vitamins.

On the other hand, there are certain things parents should avoid after a miscarriage:

  • Suppressing emotions. It’s essential to talk to someone, express feelings, and seek outlets for grief, sadness, or disappointment.
  • Avoid assuming that one miscarriage increases the likelihood of another.
  • Opt for pads rather than tampons, as there may be continued bleeding.
  • Avoid bathing in tubs, swimming in pools, or hot tubs immediately afterward to prevent infections.
  • Abstain from vaginal sex until your doctor confirms it is safe.
  • Don’t hesitate to try for another pregnancy. Many women who have experienced miscarriages later have successful pregnancies. Typically, the female reproductive organs are ready for conception again after 5-6 weeks, but consult your doctor for specific guidance.

These recommendations offer a general framework for parents who have experienced a miscarriage. Each situation is unique, so individual needs may vary.

Do’s And Don’ts After A Miscarriage

A miscarriage is the spontaneous loss of a pregnancy within 20 to 23 weeks, typically characterized by vaginal bleeding, often accompanied by cramps and period-like pain. Approximately 15% of pregnancies result in miscarriage, attributed to various factors, including:

  • Non-viable fetus
  • Blighted Ovum (Undeveloped fetus)
  • Infections
  • Poor Health Condition
  • Substance use (such as drinking, smoking, and drugs)

 

In many cases, determining a specific cause for a miscarriage is challenging. It’s crucial for parents to understand that it is rarely their fault or a result of neglect.

Following a miscarriage, what should be the next steps? Here are some recommended actions for parents:

  • Reiterate that the miscarriage was not their fault.
  • Consult with a healthcare provider and undergo examinations to check for signs of infection or other reproductive health issues.
  • Consider counseling if needed to cope with emotional challenges.
  • Allow time for both emotional and physical healing.
  • Adopt a healthier lifestyle, including a balanced diet and moderate exercise. Consult the doctor for suitable prenatal vitamins.

On the other hand, there are certain things parents should avoid after a miscarriage:

  • Suppressing emotions. It’s essential to talk to someone, express feelings, and seek outlets for grief, sadness, or disappointment.
  • Avoid assuming that one miscarriage increases the likelihood of another.
  • Opt for pads rather than tampons, as there may be continued bleeding.
  • Avoid bathing in tubs, swimming in pools, or hot tubs immediately afterward to prevent infections.
  • Abstain from vaginal sex until your doctor confirms it is safe.
  • Don’t hesitate to try for another pregnancy. Many women who have experienced miscarriages later have successful pregnancies. Typically, the female reproductive organs are ready for conception again after 5-6 weeks, but consult your doctor for specific guidance.

These recommendations offer a general framework for parents who have experienced a miscarriage. Each situation is unique, so individual needs may vary.

About Dr. Gia Pastorfide

Dr. Gia C. Pastofide obtained her pre-medical degree in BS Psychology from the University of the Philippines – Diliman, where she graduated magna cum laude.

She had her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at UP-PGH, her fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility with a focus on In Vitro Fertilization and Minimally Invasive Surgery at the National University Hospital in Singapore, her fellowship in Reproductive Medicine at The University of Tokyo Hospital, and her Masters in Reproductive Medicine and Clinical Embryology at The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Presently, Dr. Gia is the Medical Director of Victory ART Laboratory, a clinical associate professor at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UP-PGH, and an active consultant at Makati Medical Center and Cardinal Santos Medical Center.

About Dr. Gia Pastorfide

Dr. Gia C. Pastofide obtained her pre-medical degree in BS Psychology from the University of the Philippines – Diliman, where she graduated magna cum laude.

She had her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at UP-PGH, her fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility with a focus on In Vitro Fertilization and Minimally Invasive Surgery at the National University Hospital in Singapore, her fellowship in Reproductive Medicine at The University of Tokyo Hospital, and her Masters in Reproductive Medicine and Clinical Embryology at The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Presently, Dr. Gia is the Medical Director of Victory ART Laboratory, a clinical associate professor at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UP-PGH, and an active consultant at Makati Medical Center and Cardinal Santos Medical Center.